Collision Repair News

Your job requires that you keep on top of the latest in vehicle, tool, and equipment technology – I-CAR is committed to helping you do so in one convenient place. We regularly publish new articles highlighting the latest and greatest collision repair information.

So check back often and follow us on Twitter @Ask_ICAR to ensure you’re equipped with the most up-to-date collision repair technical information available in the industry.



While searching for information on advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) on an OEM repair information site, you may come across unique calibration procedures or events. These events can vary by year and model, even within a particular make. As the RTS team has been researching these systems, we have been identifying these atypical circumstances. In order to help you better understand them, we are putting together a series of articles that will help with the repair and calibration of ADAS. Let’s look at where to find the print button for documentation.


Sometimes going back-to-basics can make the difference between a quality repair and a failed repair. When it comes to straightening vehicle parts without heat, there are a few things to keep in mind.


Are you looking for OEM emergency response guides (ERGs)? The Repairability Technical Support (RTS) team has located these guides and either houses them on the RTS website, provides links to webpages that house them, or provides articles with instructions on how to locate them.


A simple bumper repair on a modern vehicle may not be as simple as it seems. New technologies like blind spot monitoring, adaptive cruise control, and other advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) utilize sensors behind the bumper covers. The ability for these sensors to be able to see clearly normally requires special caution when considering a bumper repair. Many OEMs have different levels of warnings when it comes to repairing bumper covers with ADAS. So, what does Kia say on the subject?


What are the benefits of glue pull repair (GPR) when compared with alternative paintless dent repair (PDR) methods? Discover why GPR continues to gain popularity in collision repair.


Are you looking for OEM emergency response guides (ERGs)? The Repairability Technical Support (RTS) team has located these guides and either houses them on the RTS website, provides links to webpages that house them, or provides articles with instructions on how to locate them.


Toyota has released the 2021 Issue 2 of their Collision Pros on their Collision Repair Training website.


Honda has a Body Repair News bulletin for the 2022 Honda Civic. This bulletin provides relevant repair information at-a-glance.


Ford has released the second installment of their On Target publication for 2021.


Are you looking for OEM emergency response guides (ERGs)? The Repairability Technical Support (RTS) team has located these guides and either houses them on the RTS website, provides links to webpages that house them, or provides articles with instructions on how to locate them.


What is a one-time-use part, and how do you determine if a fastener, clip, or part can be reused? These are questions that we are confronted with in the collision industry quite a lot. The other big question is "Where do I find this information"?


The 2021 SkillsUSA National Leadership and Skills Conference took place on June 10th, 2021. Every year I-CAR sends volunteers (virtually in 2021) to judge the collision repair technology competition. Let’s take a look at this year’s results.


While looking at repair procedures in a body repair manual (BRM) you may notice that symbols are used to indicate specific operations or parts to be used during the repair process. Most BRMs provide a glossary or a chart that explains these symbols.


As a collision repair technician, there is one part of a service manual that houses all of the information you would ever need…right? This is not the case with modern vehicles. You may be required to look in numerous manuals to find the information required to safely repair the vehicle.


Weld-through primers are generally a zinc-based product that is applied to the mating surfaces prior to welding. Corroding zinc forms zinc oxide, which protects the steel. This is called sacrificial corrosion. For a quality weld to be made it’s required that the weld-through primer be removed from the direct weld zone before welding the joint, when MIG welding. Many OEMs have a position on when and how to use weld-through primer or when it shouldn’t be utilized. Let’s see what Hyundai recommends and where this information can be found.