Collision Repair News

Your job requires that you keep on top of the latest in vehicle, tool, and equipment technology – I-CAR is committed to helping you do so in one convenient place. We regularly publish new articles highlighting the latest and greatest collision repair information.

So check back often and follow us on Twitter @Ask_ICAR to ensure you’re equipped with the most up-to-date collision repair technical information available in the industry.



As 2020 rolls in, we can reflect back on what the previous year had to offer. Let’s take a look at some of the collision industry information you’ve been most interested in from this past year. These are the most popular articles from 2019.


Ford has released their publication, Ford On Target 2019: Volume 4. Features of this issue include an overview of the 2019 Ford Ranger A-pillar reinforcement replacement, and how to identify Ford OEM glass.


Toyota has released the latest edition of their Collision Pros magazine on their Collision Repair Training website. This edition covers a variety of collision repair topics, such as:


While doing research on Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA) for the RTS OEM Calibration Requirements Search, the RTS team noticed on some of the ADAS systems, there is a procedure called a “PROXI alignment”. We have researched what this means in order to give you clarity, in the event you see this procedure mentioned in the service manual.


The I-CAR Repairability Technical Support (RTS) team recently developed a new I-CAR 360 video on the 2019 Subaru Legacy. The video provides a 360° tour around the new Legacy. Let’s take a look.


As vehicles are becoming more advanced, we are finding technology where it never was before. Sometimes it is in plain sight, such as infotainment systems, GPS, and a head-up display. However, sometimes it is concealed in places one may not expect.


Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA) has updated their free website, www.moparrepairconnect.com, with a new design and navigation. A key change is that Mopar Repair Connect no longer requires the creation of a username and password to access the site.


As part of the I-CAR Repairability Technical Support (RTS) OEM linking pin activity, we are helping to connect the collision repair industry to the vehicle makers. Recently we had a technical inquiry that asked for clarification on the radiator core support procedure on the 2019 Chevrolet Silverado/GMC Sierra new model light duty (LD).


While many have noticed that advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) are showing up on vehicles, there still is confusion on what is required of these systems after a collision occurs. The Ask I-CAR team frequently gets questions in regard to calibration of ADAS. Many of these questions can be answered simply by using the OEM Calibration Requirements Search. However, there are some questions that may need more details than the calibration search provides. Let’s take a look at the 2019 MAZDA6.


Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA) has released a position statement on the use of non-OEM glass. The Authentic Mopar® Glass Replacement position statement can be found on both the free and the paid websites. In the position statement, FCA states:


As vehicles are becoming more advanced, we are finding technology where it never was before. Sometimes it is in plain sight, such as infotainment systems, GPS, and a head-up display. However, sometimes it is concealed in places one may not expect.


Sometimes going back-to-basics can make the difference between a quality repair and a failed repair. When it comes to inspecting repairs for quality, there are many things to look for in order to avoid failures throughout the repair process.


What is a non-SRS wiring repair? It is the repairing of an electrical component that is not part of the supplemental restraints system circuit (usually identified by yellow wire looms). As technology increases on vehicles, so does the number of components that utilize electricity. Many of the sensors and modules are becoming smarter and more sensitive. If the wire is too long, the wrong gauge, or spliced in the wrong location, it can cause malfunctions in the components that it’s powering. Many OEMs have different restrictions and guidelines for repairing wiring that does not control SRS components. On the other hand, there are OEMs that don’t allow wiring repairs at all, so full harness replacement is the only option.


Did you know that many OEMs specify nugget size for spot and plug welds? This information is typically found within vehicle-specific repair procedures or can be found under general welding guidelines. Let’s see what Honda/Acura has to say.


While many have noticed that advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) are showing up on vehicles, there still is confusion on what is required of these systems after a collision occurs. The Ask I-CAR team frequently gets questions in regard to calibration of ADAS. Many of these questions can be answered simply by using the OEM Calibration Requirements Search. However, there are some questions that may need more details than the calibration search provides. Let’s take a look at the 2019 Lincoln Nautilus.