Collision Repair News

Your job requires that you keep on top of the latest in vehicle, tool, and equipment technology – I-CAR is committed to helping you do so in one convenient place. We regularly publish new articles highlighting the latest and greatest collision repair information.

So check back often and follow us on Twitter @Ask_ICAR to ensure you’re equipped with the most up-to-date collision repair technical information available in the industry.



We have had many inquiries about steel and aluminum outer uniside sectioning on Ford and Lincoln vehicles. To find the answers you need, let’s look at the Ford/Lincoln repair information.


As a collision repair technician, there is one part of a service manual that houses all of the information you would ever need…right? This is not the case with modern vehicles. You may be required to look in numerous manuals to find the information required to safely repair the vehicle.


Navigating OEM websites can be challenging when searching for collision repair procedures, especially as no two OEM websites are alike. What happens when you need to find other types of repair information, such as, "What needs to be inspected after a supplemental restraints system (SRS) deployment?", or "Does the tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS) require a scan tool or specialty tool?" Let's take a closer look at the Honda/Acura website.


FCA/Stellantis has updated their www.techauthority.com service and repair information pay site.


A question often asked of the Repairability Technical Support (RTS) team is, "Can heat be used to straighten?" Several OEMs provide steel repairability matrices that provide heating times and temperature limits based on the type of metal being repaired, while other OEMs have restrictions on using heat at all. Let's see what Honda/Acura has to say.


Sometimes going back-to-basics can make the difference between a quality repair and a failed repair. When it comes to anchoring with pinchweld clamps, there are a few basics to keep in mind.


While searching for information on advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) on an OEM repair information site, you may come across unique calibration procedures or events. These events can vary by year and model, even within a particular make. As the RTS team has been researching these systems, we have been identifying these atypical circumstances. In order to help you better understand them, we are putting together a series of articles that will help with the repair and calibration of ADAS. Let's look at where to find the Subaru EyeSight calibration information.


When researching calibration procedures for advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS), you may notice that many of the procedures require the use of specific tools. Some tools may be everyday items like string, tape, levels, paper, etc. However, many of them are OEM-specific tools or scan tools. Often identifying and locating where to purchase these specific tools can be difficult.

The RTS team is researching how to find these tools to make it easier for technicians performing these procedures. As we research the location of these special tools, we are compiling the information in a series of OEM-specific articles. Let’s see where you can find Kia-approved tool information.


Repairer Driven News (RDN) released an article highlighting some of the changes to the Honda Civic for 2022 and comparing them to the previous model year.


Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA) and the French PSA Group has merged to become the vehicle maker Stellantis.


The Repairability Technical Support (RTS) team has added a Reference Guide menu button to each of the FCA/Stellantis OEM Information pages.


Are you looking for OEM emergency response guides (ERGs)? The Repairability Technical Support (RTS) team has located these guides and either houses them on the RTS website, provides links to webpages that house them, or provides articles with instructions on how to locate them.


What is a non-SRS wiring repair? It is the repairing of an electrical component that is not part of the supplemental restraints system circuit (usually identified by yellow wire looms). As technology increases on vehicles, so does the number of components that utilize electricity. Many of the sensors and modules are becoming smarter and more sensitive. If the wire is too long, the wrong gauge, or spliced in the wrong location, it can cause malfunctions in the components that it’s powering. Many OEMs have different restrictions and guidelines for repairing wiring that does not control SRS components. On the other hand, there are OEMs that don’t allow wiring repairs at all, so full harness replacement is the only option.


Are you looking for OEM emergency response guides (ERGs)? The Repairability Technical Support (RTS) team has located these guides and either houses them on the RTS website, provides links to webpages that house them, or provides articles with instructions on how to locate them.


Electric vehicles (EVs) are one trend you can’t afford to play catch up on - the learning curve is too high and proper procedures are critical for your personal safety. I-CAR recognized a need for an industry-vetted best practices for disconnecting high-voltage (HV) systems when the OEM has not published a position statement or vehicle-specific information.