Collision Repair News

Your job requires that you keep on top of the latest in vehicle, tool, and equipment technology – I-CAR is committed to helping you do so in one convenient place. We regularly publish new articles highlighting the latest and greatest collision repair information.

So check back often and follow us on Twitter @Ask_ICAR to ensure you’re equipped with the most up-to-date collision repair technical information available in the industry.



As vehicles are becoming more advanced, we are finding technology where it never was before. Sometimes it is in plain sight, such as infotainment systems, GPS, and head-up display. However, sometimes it is concealed in places one may not expect.


While many have noticed that advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) are showing up on vehicles, there still is confusion on what is required of these systems after a collision occurs. The Ask I-CAR team frequently gets questions in regard to calibration of ADAS. Many of these questions can be answered simply by searching the OEM Calibration Requirements Search. However, there are some questions that may need more details than the calibration search provides. Let’s take a look at the 2019 Kia Sportage ADAS.


Thousands of feet of wire is used in modern vehicles. Driven by consumer demand for more tech features, along with the incorporation of advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS), we won’t likely be turning back on the amount of wire used. With all of that wire, some organization is needed to keep things straight. Wires headed to the same destinations are bundled into wire harnesses. While this is great for keeping all these wires under control, it can make it difficult to find an electrical problem after a collision.


Repairer Driven News released an article on the changes to the 2020 CR-V. The Honda CR-V now comes standard with Honda Sensing for all trim packages. This means that 90% of their entire vehicle line up is equipped with this system. With more advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS), it is even more important to follow OEM procedures for calibrating these systems. In an earlier position statement, Honda states: “The proliferation of electronic control systems has increased the number of potential DTCs beyond the point where a dashboard indicator can be installed and/or illuminated for every DTC. Dashboard indicators are intended for driver notification, not vehicle diagnostics.”


Repairer driven news released an article on the changes to the 2020 Land Rover Defender. This Defender is no longer a body over frame design. In fact, the structure of this vehicle is unlike any other Land Rover model with its own new platform. The “purpose-engineered” D7x platform was built to be the stiffest structure Land Rover has ever made. The body of this vehicle is aluminum intensive and lightweight.


Electrical circuits are nothing new in the collision industry. Vehicle circuits primarily use direct current (DC) for electricity, which requires every circuit to have a good ground in order to be closed. The more advanced vehicle electrical systems become, the more need there is for additional grounds.


As part of the I-CAR Repairability Technical Support (RTS) OEM linking pin activity, we are helping to connect the collision repair industry to the vehicle makers. Recently we had a technical inquiry that asked if Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA) allows parking sensors to be refinished.


While many have noticed that advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) are showing up on vehicles, there still is confusion on what is required of these systems after a collision occurs. The Ask I-CAR team frequently gets questions in regard to calibration of ADAS. Many of these questions can be answered simply by searching the OEM Calibration Requirements Search. However, there are some questions that may need more detail than the calibration search provides. Let’s take a look at the 2019 Chevrolet Silverado ADAS.


There are many precautions and instructions to follow while repairing hybrid and electric vehicles. To help you find this information, RTS has an OEM Hybrid And Electric Vehicle Disable Search page. Here you will find step-by-step instructions on how to find the disable procedure in the service manual. You will also find precautions for welding, refinishing, and if a scan tool and DVOM are required for disabling. Let’s take a look at the 2019 Chevrolet Volt.


As vehicles are becoming more advanced, we are finding technology where it never was before. Sometimes it is in plain sight, such as infotainment systems, GPS, and a head-up display. However, sometimes it is concealed in places one may not expect.


Electric cars are becoming more popular than ever and the number of them on the road is increasing every year. Repairer Driven News recently published an article about how electric cars could lead to more crashes. This potential increase is tied to the way electric cars function.


One of the top technical inquires received at Ask I-CAR is, “Is there a sectioning or partial replacement procedure available?” To help answer this question, RTS has an OEM Partial Part Replacement Search available. Here you will find information on if these procedures are available on a specific vehicle. Let’s take a closer look at the 2019 Jaguar I-Pace.


What is a non-SRS wiring repair? It is the repairing of an electrical component that is not part of the supplemental restraint system circuit (usually identified by yellow wire looms). As technology increases on vehicles, so does the number of components that utilize electricity. Many of the sensors and modules are becoming smarter and more sensitive. If the wire is too long, the wrong gauge, or spliced in the wrong location it can cause malfunctions in the components that it’s powering. Many OEMs have different restrictions and guidelines for repairing wiring that does not control SRS components. On the other hand, there are OEMs that don’t allow wiring repairs at all, so full harness replacement is the only option.


While many have noticed that advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) are showing up on vehicles, there still is confusion on what is required of these systems after a collision occurs. The Ask I-CAR team frequently gets questions in regard to calibration of ADAS. Many of these questions can be answered simply by searching the OEM Calibration Requirements Search. However, there are some questions that may need more details than the calibration search provides. Let’s take a look at the 2019 Subaru Crosstrek ADAS.


Toyota has released their second edition for 2019 of their Collision Pros on their Collision Repair Training website. This edition touches on a variety of collision repair topics, such as the Toyota Supra, training, affixing emblems, calibration, and more.