Collision Repair News

Your job requires that you keep on top of the latest in vehicle, tool and equipment technology – I-CAR is committed to helping you do so in one convenient place. We’ll be regularly publishing new articles with the latest and greatest collision repair information.

So check back often and follow us on Twitter @Ask_ICAR to ensure you’re equipped with the most up-to-date collision repair technical information available in the industry.



Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA) has updated their free website, www.moparrepairconnect.com, with a new design and navigation. A key change is that Mopar Repair Connect no longer requires the creation of a username and password to access the site.


As part of the I-CAR Repairability Technical Support (RTS) OEM linking pin activity, we are helping to connect the collision repair industry to the vehicle makers. Recently we had a technical inquiry that asked for clarification on the radiator core support procedure on the 2019 Chevrolet Silverado/GMC Sierra new model light duty (LD).


While many have noticed that advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) are showing up on vehicles, there still is confusion on what is required of these systems after a collision occurs. The Ask I-CAR team frequently gets questions in regard to calibration of ADAS. Many of these questions can be answered simply by using the OEM Calibration Requirements Search. However, there are some questions that may need more details than the calibration search provides. Let’s take a look at the 2019 MAZDA6.


Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA) has released a position statement on the use of non-OEM glass. The Authentic Mopar® Glass Replacement position statement can be found on both the free and the paid websites. In the position statement, FCA states:


As vehicles are becoming more advanced, we are finding technology where it never was before. Sometimes it is in plain sight, such as infotainment systems, GPS, and a head-up display. However, sometimes it is concealed in places one may not expect.


Sometimes going back-to-basics can make the difference between a quality repair and a failed repair. When it comes to inspecting repairs for quality, there are many things to look for in order to avoid failures throughout the repair process.


What is a non-SRS wiring repair? It is the repairing of an electrical component that is not part of the supplemental restraint system circuit (usually identified by yellow wire looms). As technology increases on vehicles, so does the number of components that utilize electricity. Many of the sensors and modules are becoming smarter and more sensitive. If the wire is too long, the wrong gauge, or spliced in the wrong location, it can cause malfunctions in the components that it’s powering. Many OEMs have different restrictions and guidelines for repairing wiring that does not control SRS components. On the other hand, there are OEMs that don’t allow wiring repairs at all, so full harness replacement is the only option.


Did you know that many OEMs specify nugget size for spot and plug welds? This information is typically found within vehicle-specific repair procedures or can be found under general welding guidelines. Let’s see what Honda/Acura has to say.


While many have noticed that advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) are showing up on vehicles, there still is confusion on what is required of these systems after a collision occurs. The Ask I-CAR team frequently gets questions in regard to calibration of ADAS. Many of these questions can be answered simply by using the OEM Calibration Requirements Search. However, there are some questions that may need more details than the calibration search provides. Let’s take a look at the 2019 Lincoln Nautilus.


One of the top technical inquiries received at Ask I-CAR is, “Is there a sectioning or partial replacement procedure available?” To help answer this question, RTS has an OEM Partial Part Replacement Search available. Here you will find information on if these procedures are available on a specific vehicle. Let’s take a closer look at the 2019 Subaru Ascent


Repairer Driven News released an article focusing on factory spot welds and how OEM repair procedures may differ from how it was assembled at the factory. It touches on how factory equipment compares to what is available to the collision repair facilities and the effect this may have on the repair procedure.


The article released by Repairer Driven News (RDN) states that Honda body repair manuals and procedures are “written from the perspective of a body in white”. This means that other parts of the service site may need to be referenced for removal and installation of related parts, or other related operations, in order to proceed with procedures in the body repair manual (BRM).


While many have noticed that advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) are showing up on vehicles, there still is confusion on what is required of these systems after a collision occurs. The Ask I-CAR team frequently gets questions in regard to calibration of ADAS. Many of these questions can be answered simply by using the OEM Calibration Requirements Search. However, there are some questions that may need more details than the calibration search provides. Let’s take a look at the 2019 Nissan Murano.


Repairer Driven News released an article that provides insight on Toyota occupant classification systems (OCS). It covers what the systems do, why it is important to calibrate them, and when calibration is required.


As vehicles are becoming more advanced, we are finding technology where it never was before. Sometimes it is in plain sight, such as infotainment systems, GPS, and a head-up display. However, sometimes it is concealed in places one may not expect.