Collision Repair News

Your job requires that you keep on top of the latest in vehicle, tool, and equipment technology – I-CAR is committed to helping you do so in one convenient place. We regularly publish new articles highlighting the latest and greatest collision repair information.

So check back often and follow us on Twitter @Ask_ICAR to ensure you’re equipped with the most up-to-date collision repair technical information available in the industry.



A simple bumper repair on a modern vehicle may not be as simple as it seems. New technologies like blind spot monitoring, adaptive cruise control, and other advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) utilize sensors behind the bumper covers. The ability for these sensors to be able to see clearly, normally requires special caution when considering a bumper repair. Many OEMs have different levels of warnings when it comes to repairing bumper covers with ADAS. So, what does Audi say on the subject?


Hyundai Motor America has started to release body repair manuals in the United States!


A key part of being able to diagnose a problem with advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) is understanding how the system works. Knowing what is happening inside the system will help you properly diagnose why the system may be failing. This will prevent replacing parts that are not causing the system issue. Let’s take a look at the inner workings of a traffic sign recognition system.


Some advanced driver assistance system (ADAS) components need to be precisely calibrated to the exact OEM specifications. Even one degree could cause a camera or sensor to miss a target or object by many feet, depending on the distance to the object. Imagine if while driving down the road you’re looking off to the right, your head is not turned, just your eyes. Your head is in the correct position, but your eyes are aimed at the wrong location. Can you see what is coming from the left side? This is the same for ADAS sensors and cameras.


The 2019 Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra have two procedures for replacing the front-end module (Body Front Structure Parts Replacement). The front-end module consists of the radiator core support, front upper rail assemblies, front wheelhouse panel reinforcement, and supporting brackets. These procedures are differentiated depending when the vehicle was built. While researching these procedures, we observed what appeared to be conflicting information within the procedures. We reached out to General Motors (GM). Here is what they had to say.


Ford has released their publication, Ford On Target 2020: Volume 2. Features of this issue include an in-depth article on Ford’s position statement on the use of non-OEM structural rivets and glass. Information on the approved bonding adhesives for carbon fiber repairs on the Ford GT, and a continuation of the breakdown of the materials used in the construction of the 2020 Lincoln Corsair are also highlighted.


I-CAR and the I-CAR Repairability Technical Support (RTS) team put together a series of live webinars that discuss aspects of today’s advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) and what the industry needs to know. These informative and fun webinars are sure to educate and entertain. In case you missed it; we put the video of the webinar on the RTS website for easy access.


Repairer Driven News (RDN) released an article on the 2022 Volkswagen (VW) Tiguan. The article focuses on new or updated advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) that change the way the vehicle may be driven.


General Motors (GM) released a document that covers advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) information. The document provides an overview of all ADAS and components in one convenient location.


Have you ever asked yourself, "Why doesn’t I-CAR have a course on a specific topic?" Well, we have great news for you!


Repairer Driven News released an article on the 2021 Ford F-150. The article focuses on the available hybrid powertrain known as PowerBoost. This system will give an estimated 700-mile driving range.


Parking sensors are part of the park assist system, just one of many advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) found on vehicles today. Damaged sensors are typically replaced and may require painting to match the vehicle. Vehicle makers often provide information on the painting of new sensors. Some vehicle makers do not recommend refinishing sensors with minor finish damage because excessive paint thickness may adversely affect the operation of the parking assist system. However, other vehicle makers allow refinishing and will provide guidelines.


Parking sensors are part of the park assist system, just one of many advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) found on vehicles today. Damaged sensors are typically replaced and may require painting to match the vehicle. Vehicle makers often provide information on the painting of new sensors. Some vehicle makers do not recommend refinishing sensors with minor finish damage because excessive paint thickness may adversely affect the operation of the parking assist system. However, other vehicle makers do allow refinishing and will provide guidelines. Let’s see what Audi has to say.


Looking for more information about a specific repair procedure? Some OEMs are now providing videos within the repair procedures on their service site. Vehicle makers may also have additional websites that contain repair videos. As we research OEM websites and find these helpful videos, we will write articles to let you know. Let’s take a closer look at General Motors (GM).


While searching for information on advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) on an OEM repair information site, you may come across unique calibration procedures or events. These events can vary by year and model, even within a particular make. As the RTS team has been researching these systems, we have been identifying these atypical circumstances. In order to help you better understand them, we are putting together a series of articles that will help with the repair and calibration of ADAS. Let’s take a closer look at Nissan/INFINITI action tests.