Collision Repair News

Your job requires that you keep on top of the latest in vehicle, tool, and equipment technology – I-CAR is committed to helping you do so in one convenient place. We regularly publish new articles highlighting the latest and greatest collision repair information.

So check back often and follow us on Twitter @Ask_ICAR to ensure you’re equipped with the most up-to-date collision repair technical information available in the industry.



Repairer Driven News (RDN) released an article highlighting some of the changes to the Toyota Tundra for 2022.


While looking at repair procedures in a body repair manual (BRM) you may notice that symbols are used to indicate specific operations or parts to be used during the repair process. Most BRMs provide a glossary or a chart that explains these symbols.


Navigating OEM websites can be challenging when searching for collision repair procedures, especially as no two OEM websites are alike. What happens when you need to find other types of repair information, such as, "What needs to be inspected after a supplemental restraint system (SRS) deployment", or "Does the tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS) require a scan tool or specialty tool?" Let's take a closer look at the Genesis website.


Why do I need a subscription to an OEM website if I have full subscription access to the I-CAR Repairability Technical Support (RTS) portal? This is a question received on a regular basis through Ask I-CAR. Let’s take a look at why and how to purchase an OEM subscription.


As part of the I-CAR Repairability Technical Support (RTS) OEM linking pin activity, we are helping to connect the collision repair industry to the vehicle makers. We‘ve had technical inquiries that asked for clarification on repairing aluminum parts or assemblies with adhesively bonded joints on Ford/Lincoln vehicles.


The Gladiator brought a new look to the world of Jeep vehicles in 2020, and with that, comes a new detail to keep an eye out for. In the body repair manual (BRM), FCA/Stellantis calls attention to an issue with the doors that technicians should check for during installation.


As part of the I-CAR Repairability Technical Support (RTS) OEM linking pin activity, we are helping to connect the collision repair industry to the vehicle makers. Recently we’ve received an inquiry asking for clarification on why a diagnostic trouble code (DTC) did not show up on a scan with a deployed airbag. We reached out to Honda/Acura for clarification.


A simple bumper repair on a modern vehicle may not be as simple as it seems. New technologies like blind spot monitoring, adaptive cruise control, and other advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) utilize sensors behind the bumper covers. The ability for these sensors to be able to see clearly normally requires special caution when considering a bumper repair. Many OEMs have different levels of warnings when it comes to repairing bumper covers with ADAS. So, what does Nissan/INFINITI say on the subject?


When it comes to repair information, vehicle makers use a wide variety of terminology for replacement parts. All of the different names can be confusing, especially when repairing a variety of vehicle makes and models.


You’ve heard them referred to "computers on wheels." Modern vehicle technology you’re seeing on the road and in shops today requires a pre-scan of their computer network to identify where the repair work is needed. However, the data is of no use without a knowledgeable technician or team of technicians to interpret and act on it.


I-CAR is having a discussion on replacement methods of a factory laser-brazed roof panel with industry experts. Tune into Repairers Realm to listen and join in for questions and answers.


We have had many inquiries about steel and aluminum outer uniside sectioning on Ford and Lincoln vehicles. To find the answers you need, let’s look at the Ford/Lincoln repair information.


As a collision repair technician, there is one part of a service manual that houses all of the information you would ever need…right? This is not the case with modern vehicles. You may be required to look in numerous manuals to find the information required to safely repair the vehicle.


Navigating OEM websites can be challenging when searching for collision repair procedures, especially as no two OEM websites are alike. What happens when you need to find other types of repair information, such as, "What needs to be inspected after a supplemental restraints system (SRS) deployment?", or "Does the tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS) require a scan tool or specialty tool?" Let's take a closer look at the Honda/Acura website.


FCA/Stellantis has updated their www.techauthority.com service and repair information pay site.