Collision Repair News

Your job requires that you keep on top of the latest in vehicle, tool, and equipment technology – I-CAR is committed to helping you do so in one convenient place. We regularly publish new articles highlighting the latest and greatest collision repair information.

So check back often and follow us on Twitter @Ask_ICAR to ensure you’re equipped with the most up-to-date collision repair technical information available in the industry.



I-CAR has developed a hands-on course that will improve the knowledge base of learners regarding static calibrations on advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS). During the course, the learner will also gain experience with multiple vehicles and different systems.


I-CAR had a discussion with industry experts on replacing an F-150 outer box side.


When researching procedures for disabling a high-voltage (HV) vehicle, you may notice that many of the procedures require the use of specific tools. Some of them are OEM-specific tools or scan tools. Often identifying and locating where to purchase these specific tools can be difficult.


Weld-through primers are generally a zinc-based product that are applied to the mating surfaces prior to welding. Corroding zinc forms zinc oxide which protects the steel. This is called sacrificial corrosion. For a quality weld to be made it’s required that the weld-through primer be removed from the direct weld zone before welding the joint when GMA welding. Many OEMs have a position on when and how to use weld-through primer or when it shouldn’t be utilized. Let’s see what Rolls-Royce recommends and where this information can be found.


As electric-only, hybrid, and fuel cell electric vehicles are increasing in sales, they are becoming more commonplace in repair facilities. Along with the unique powertrains that come with these vehicles, also comes unique safety concerns. Regardless of vehicle maker, high-voltage (HV) systems pose a threat of injury or death if not handled properly. Only personnel with the proper training, PPE, tools, equipment, and service information should perform work on the HV systems.


Park assist sensors are part of the park assist system, just one of many advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) found on vehicles today. Damaged sensors are typically replaced and may require painting to match the vehicle. Vehicle makers often provide information on the painting of new sensors. Some vehicle makers do not recommend refinishing sensors with minor finish damage because excessive paint thickness may adversely affect the operation of the parkassist system. However, other vehicle makers do allow refinishing and will provide guidelines. Let’s see what BMW/Mini has to say.


While searching for information on advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) on an OEM repair information site, you may come across unique calibration procedures, events, or bulletins. These events can vary by year and model, even within a particular make. As the RTS team has been researching these systems, we have been identifying these atypical circumstances. In order to help you better understand them, we are putting together a series of articles that will help with the repair and calibration of ADAS. Let’s take a closer look at General Motors 2017-2020 Buick Encore.


The twentieth installment of the I-CAR Collision Reporter - Special Issue has been released. This issue focuses on I-CAR's technical team and the team’s capabilities.


The question is often asked, "Can supplemental restraints system wiring be repaired?" The answer is: it depends on the vehicle maker. Let's take a look at Genesis on this subject.


As electric-only, hybrid, and fuel cell electric vehicles are increasing in sales, they are becoming more commonplace in repair facilities. Along with the unique powertrains that come with these vehicles, also comes unique safety concerns. Regardless of vehicle maker, high-voltage (HV) systems pose a threat of injury or death if not handled properly. Only personnel with the proper training, PPE, tools, equipment, and service information should perform work on the HV systems.


What is the MPa of the front lower rail? What is the outer uniside made of: steel, aluminum, or composite? Can heat be used to straighten or is it cold straightening only? What are the repair limitations? These are just some of the questions that the RTS team fields on a daily basis.

As we know, today’s vehicles can be constructed from a wide variety of materials. Knowing if the OEM provides information on body construction materials and repair guidelines is a crucial step in providing a complete, safe, and quality repair. Let’s see what Tesla has to say.


When researching procedures for disabling a high-voltage (HV) vehicle, you may notice that many of the procedures require the use of specific tools. Some of them are OEM-specific tools or scan tools. Often identifying and locating where to purchase these specific tools can be difficult.

The RTS team is researching how to find these tools to make it easier for technicians performing these tasks. As we research the location of these special tools, we are compiling the information in a series of OEM-specific articles.


What should you do when a damaged Tesla comes into your repair facility? Can you measure it? Can it be straightened? What needs to be replaced?


Automotive coatings continue to be an ever-evolving aspect of vehicles. In the beginning, it was only about corrosion protection and not appearance. Now color has become a major factor in vehicle sales, driving OEMs to offer the latest and greatest finishes to their vehicle line up. One trend is the increasing use of matte finishes.


I-CAR wraps up a three-part series with a discussion with industry experts on plastic repair.