Collision Repair News

Your job requires that you keep on top of the latest in vehicle, tool and equipment technology – I-CAR is committed to helping you do so in one convenient place. We’ll be regularly publishing new articles with the latest and greatest collision repair information.

So check back often and follow us on Twitter @Ask_ICAR to ensure you’re equipped with the most up-to-date collision repair technical information available in the industry.



Volume 2 of the 2014 On Target publication from Ford is now available. Read about the 2015 Ford F-150 and the greener single-stage paint process on the 2015 Ford Transit.


Kia Motors now has sectioning procedures available for the 2011-14 Sorento and the 2007-10 Rondo. This information has also been updated on the I-CAR developed OEM Partial Parts Replacement Search. The body repair manuals for Kia are available on Kia's free website at: www.kiatechinfo.com


Want to be the first to hear about new I-CAR Collision Repair News articles? Then come follow us on Twitter @Ask_ICAR.


You're now able to access the Ford-Recommended Steel Repairability Matrix directly from the I-CAR Repairability Technical Support Portal. This is the latest addition to the Ford-specific OEM Information page.


You may or may not have read them, so here's your chance to catch up! Archived issues of the Ford On Target publication from 2013 are now available.


Let's continue our breakdown of the columns in the OEM Technical Information Matrix. The eighth column calls out if the vehicle maker requires the use of weld-through primer on flanges in preparation for welding.


On August 7, 2014, I-CAR announced the launching of a completely redesigned website at www.i-car.com. The new site has been carefully planned and meticulously designed to provide the industry with a comprehensive, easy-to-use online resource for collision repair education, knowledge and solutions.


There's a new addition to the OEM Information for Honda and Acura. An icon has been added that will link you to a page that contains hybrid vehicle Emergency Response Guides and an Emergency Response Quick Reference.


As you're likely aware, when the new I-CAR website was launched (August 2014), it was done so without the I-CAR Advantage. That did not sit well with some of you and thankfully you voiced your concern to us. We are happy to let you know that it's back online and accessible to all. Previous Advantage articles are now available at advantage.i-car.com. We are also linking you to the Advantage Online archive from the Collision Repair News homepage using a button like the one you see below.


When it comes to repair information, vehicle makers use a wide variety of terminology for replacement parts. All of the different names can be confusing, especially when repairing a variety of vehicle makes and models.


When spot welding is used during repairs, UHSS may not weld the same as mild steel. The welder will need a different setting for UHSS to make a good weld. The vehicle maker may also have requirements for a specific spot welding machine that may have preset programs for specific applications. Some spot welders may only need the sheet thickness and the type of material to be input and the welder will make the necessary adjustments.


Let's continue our breakdown of the columns in the OEM Technical Information Matrix. The seventh column calls out if the vehicle maker has information in regard to the recommended attachment method and the equipment required for complete, quality, and safe repairs.


The Repairability Technical Support Portal continues to support some of the same great features that were originally on www.i-car.com, like collision repair news.  That is why Collision Repair News is the new name for the articles that you came to know and love in the I-CAR Advantage.


When GMA (MIG) welding ultra-high-strength steel (UHSS), like boron-alloyed steel, there are a few additional things to consider. Most UHSS parts are typically replaced using squeeze-type resistance spot welds (STRSW) at a factory seam and GMA (MIG) plug welds used to attach the part where a spot welder cannot reach.


When it comes to repair information, vehicle makers use a wide variety of terminology for replacement parts. All of the different names can be confusing, especially when repairing a variety of vehicle makes and models.