Collision Repair Attachment Methods, Description, and Equipment Requirements Information on the OEM Technical Information Matrix

Collision Repair Attachment Methods, Description, and Equipment Requirements Information on the OEM Technical Information Matrix

Let's continue our breakdown of the columns in the OEM Technical Information Matrix. The seventh column calls out if the vehicle maker has information in regard to the recommended attachment method and the equipment required for complete, quality, and safe repairs.

As an example of the type of information that would be found from the vehicle maker for attachment methods, the 2013 Honda Accord body repair manual states "1,500 MPa steel parts MUST be replaced at factory seams using squeeze-type resistance spot welding (STRSW)". The body repair manual also states "MIG brazed joints should be used ONLY in locations not accessible by a spot welder (on 1500 MPa Steel)." Having this type of information will allow the vehicle to be repaired using the correct attachment method.

As an example of the type of information that would be found from the vehicle maker for equipment requirements, lets take a look at the 2015 Ford F-150. In order to weld parts of the aluminum body, Ford requires a MIG welder that is 220 volts and has pulse-transfer capability. While Ford does not require a specific model of welder other vehicle makers like Jaguar Land Rover will have specific brands of equipment that is required to be part of their collision repair network.

As you can see from the OEM Technical Information Matrix, most OEMs have information on the type of attachment methods to be used and the equipment parameters needed to make a complete, quality, and safe repair.


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