Collision Repair News

Your job requires that you keep on top of the latest in vehicle, tool, and equipment technology – I-CAR is committed to helping you do so in one convenient place. We regularly publish new articles highlighting the latest and greatest collision repair information.

So check back often and follow us on Twitter @Ask_ICAR to ensure you’re equipped with the most up-to-date collision repair technical information available in the industry.



When researching procedures for disabling a high-voltage (HV) vehicle, you may notice that many of the procedures require the use of specific tools. Some of them are OEM-specific tools or scan tools. Often identifying and locating where to purchase these specific tools can be difficult.


When researching procedures for disabling a high-voltage (HV) vehicle, you may notice that many of the procedures require the use of specific tools. Some of them are OEM-specific tools or scan tools. Often identifying and locating where to purchase these specific tools can be difficult.


Repairer Driven News (RDN) released an article highlighting an upcoming advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) change for General Motors (GM).


As part of the I-CAR Repairability Technical Support (RTS) OEM linking pin activity, we are helping to connect the collision repair industry to the vehicle makers. We‘ve had technical inquiries that asked for clarification on if service parts can be disassembled for installation. We reached out to Ford/Lincoln for clarification.


When researching calibration procedures for advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS), you may notice that many of the procedures require the use of specific tools. Some tools may be everyday items like string, tape, levels, paper, etc. However, many of them are OEM-specific tools or scan tools. Often identifying and locating where to purchase these specific tools can be difficult.

The RTS team is researching how to find these tools to make it easier for technicians performing these procedures. As we research the location of these special tools, we are compiling the information in a series of OEM-specific articles. Let’s see where you can find Ford/Lincoln-approved tool information.


Toyota has released a Collision Pro article about the use of adhesive on Toyota vehicles. This article also includes adhesive guidelines and best practices.


I-CAR provides clarity on the attachment methods required when installing Honda replacement roofs, including prep and installation of the mounting tabs on the vehicle structure.


Ford has released the third installment of their On Target publication for 2021. Features of this issue include information about upgraded diagnostic equipment and software, and much more.


Vehicle makers may group their body repair manuals (BRM) in several different ways. Sometimes the BRMs will be grouped by a year range, some are listed as VIN specific, and others are arranged by a body code. Let’s take a look at Kia to see how they group their BRMs.


As part of the I-CAR Repairability Technical Support (RTS) OEM linking pin activity, we are helping to connect the collision repair industry to the vehicle makers. We‘ve had technical inquiries that asked for clarification on repairing cosmetic panels on a 2015-present Ford F-150.


In Europe, MIG brazing has been required or recommended on a widespread basis for several years. In the U.S., MIG brazing is not as common but is becoming more prevalent. As the RTS team is researching MIG brazing information, we are putting together a series of articles that identify OEM-specific MIG brazing recommendations and requirements for vehicles in the U.S. Let’s see what Mercedes-Benz has to say.


Sometimes going back-to-basics can make the difference between a quality repair and a failed repair. When it comes to repairing the hood, hood striker, and hood hinges, here are a few things to keep in mind.


Repairer Driven News (RDN) released an article highlighting some of the changes to the Toyota Tundra for 2022.


While looking at repair procedures in a body repair manual (BRM) you may notice that symbols are used to indicate specific operations or parts to be used during the repair process. Most BRMs provide a glossary or a chart that explains these symbols.


Navigating OEM websites can be challenging when searching for collision repair procedures, especially as no two OEM websites are alike. What happens when you need to find other types of repair information, such as, "What needs to be inspected after a supplemental restraint system (SRS) deployment", or "Does the tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS) require a scan tool or specialty tool?" Let's take a closer look at the Genesis website.