The 2020 model year vehicles are starting to roll off the assembly line and into showrooms. The I-CAR course, Vehicle Technology And Trends 2020, covers the technology, model releases, and trends. Keeping up-to-date on the 2020 models and features is vital to the blueprinting and repair process.


Since advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS), scanning, and calibration first started becoming relevant, members of the collision repair industry have required as much knowledge as possible on these subjects. I-CAR’s Repairability Technical Support (RTS) team continues to be on the leading edge of research and education. Our goal is to help communicate information to the industry, and a great way to do this is through Collision Repair News articles.


Repairer Driven News published an article on why technicians at Porsche have told the repair industry that technicians are to never repair Porsche wheels. A collision repair technology instructor for Porsche named Mike Kukavica elaborated on why this rule was put in place.


Ask I-CAR receives many technical inquiries referring to sectioning. The collision repair industry wants to know where can you section, does the OEM have a sectioning procedure, and where can I find the sectioning procedure? Most OEMs allow sectioning to outer body panels and the front and rear rails. Sectioning reinforcements is not as common, as most reinforcements are replaced at factory seams. Parts are made from various materials including HSS, UHSS, aluminum, and carbon fiber. These parts also have complex designs to collapse or transfer collision forces in a specific manner. Introducing a sectioning joint to many of these…


Weld-through primers are generally a zinc-based product that is applied to the mating surfaces prior to welding. Corroding zinc forms zinc oxide, which protects the steel. This is called sacrificial corrosion. For a quality weld to be made it’s required that the weld-through primer be removed from the direct weld zone before welding the joint, when MIG welding. Many OEMs have a position on when and how to use weld-through primer or when it shouldn’t be utilized. Let’s see what Porsche recommends and where this information can be found.


Weld-through primers are generally a zinc-based product that is applied to the mating surfaces prior to welding. Corroding zinc forms zinc oxide, which protects the steel. This is called sacrificial corrosion. For a quality weld to be made it’s required that the weld-through primer be removed from the direct weld zone before welding the joint, when MIG welding. Many OEMs have a position on when and how to use weld-through primer or when it shouldn’t be utilized. Let’s see what we have found for weld-through primer guidelines.


Periodically, I-CAR Repairability Summits are held to bring together collision industry stakeholders and subject matter experts to develop collision repair processes and best practices for repair of late-model, collision damaged vehicles. In the I-CAR Repairability Summit the topic of collision repair diagnostics definitions was discussed.


When it comes to repair information, vehicle makers use a wide variety of terminology for replacement parts. All of the different names can be confusing, especially when repairing a variety of vehicle makes and models.


In case you missed it, there is now an article posted that identifies what each OEM generally uses for part terminology in their body repair manuals. All of the different names can be confusing, especially when repairing a variety of vehicle makes and models.


This article originally appeared in the November/December edition of Fixed Ops Magazine. Collision repair professionals are no different than any other professional – we are resistant to change. It took many years for repairers to make the switch to “MIG welding” for welding early unibody vehicles. (For this article we’ll use the term gas metal arc welding (GMAW) metal inert gas (MIG), or GMA (MIG)). (More on the reason, later.) It was a technology that was unfamiliar to many and there wasn’t a perceived need for change. History would prove otherwise, as there may not be a collision repair business…


Repair or Replace? – Material Tensile Strength Key to Repairability Jason Bartanen, I-CAR Director, Industry Technical Relations The world of steels continues to evolve at a rapid pace and repair professionals need to keep up. In order to perform complete, safe, and quality repairs, it’s imperative to identify the type of material we’re working with, to know what is repairable, and know which options we have for part replacement when straightening is not an option.


Today's Vehicles Require Updated Collision Repair Tools and Training By Jason Bartanen Ever since the unveiling of the 2015 Ford F-150 at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit in January, the U.S. automotive industry has been buzzing about this game changing, aluminum intensive vehicle.


If there is a sectioning procedure on a front lower rail, GMA (MIG) welding across a seam is the usual method for attaching the new joint. On at least two late model Porsche vehicles, however, there is a front lower rail sectioning procedure that uses no welds at all. The rails on the Panamera, since 2010, and the 911, since 2012, both have aluminum construction.


What's Iowa Got to Do With It? The Aluminum Difference by Jason Bartanen, Director, I-CAR Industry Technical Relations We've seen a lot of changes in vehicle technology over the years. With each of these changes come new challenges and new opportunities. When the unibody vehicle was introduced, repair professionals were required to change their approach to collision repair, from damage analysis through the repair process. With the introduction of GMA (MIG) welding, additional requirements for repairs included new training and equipment. And passive restraint systems presented a completely different type of challenge, involving electronics and diagnostics.