We often receive the Ask I-CAR inquiries: "Does Mitsubishi have a position statement on pre- and post-repair system scanning? Do they plan on coming out with one?"


Since advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS), scanning, and calibration first started becoming relevant, members of the collision repair industry have required as much knowledge as possible on these subjects. I-CAR’s Repairability Technical Support (RTS) team continues to be on the leading edge of research and education. Our goal is to help communicate information to the industry, and a great way to do this is through Collision Repair News articles.


Are you wondering if a particular OEM or organization has a published position statement on pre-repair and post-repair scanning? We have compiled a list of most of the position statements on the subject, so you can easily find the particular statement you are looking for. The following articles give you a brief summary of the position statement along with a link to the full statement.


This highly visible malfunction indicator lamp (MIL), also known as a check engine light, can be set off for a variety of reasons related to electrical problems, mechanical issues, and even after a crash. Scan tools can usually pick up the diagnostic trouble codes (DTC) to assist in figuring out where the issue lies so it can be fixed, but this is not always a guaranteed way to find the problem. Some issues, such as flaws in calibration, will not trigger the check engine light or report any diagnostic trouble codes.


As a collision repair technician, it may seem like all the necessary information you would need would be located in the service manual, but this is not the case for modern vehicles. Sometimes the information for a complete repair can be housed in multiple manuals. Fortunately, The Repairability Technical Support Portal (RTS) has videos on how to navigate each OEM website.


Tuesday at SEMA, I-CAR held a panel discussion on advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) and real-world collision challenges. The panel was headed by Jason Bartanen (Industry Technical Relations Director, I-CAR), Jake Rodenroth (Director of Industry Relations, asTech), and Jason Zeise (Mechanical Operations Manager, LaMettry's Collision, Inc.).


One of the top technical inquiries received at Ask I-CAR, “Is there a sectioning or partial replacement procedure available?” To help answer this question, RTS has an OEM Partial Part Replacement Search available. Here you will find information on if these procedures are available on a specific vehicle. Let’s take a closer look at the 2018 Mitsubishi Mirage.


What is a non-SRS wiring repair? It is the repairing of an electrical component that is not part of the supplemental restraint system circuit (usually identified by yellow wire looms). As technology increases on vehicles, so does the number of components that utilize electricity. Many of the sensors and modules are becoming smarter and more sensitive. If the wire is too long, the wrong gauge, or spliced in the wrong location it can cause malfunctions in the components that it’s powering. Many OEMs have different restrictions and guidelines for repairing wiring that does not control SRS components. On the other…


As a collision repair technician, there is one part of a service manual that houses all of the information you would ever need…right? This is not the case with modern vehicles. You may be required to look in numerous manuals to find the information required to safely repair the vehicle.


As the automotive industry moves deeper into the mobility arena, it also enters a more challenging realm for the collision repair industry. The wide array of Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) that provide active safety measures for vehicle occupants are powered by an electronic communication network that requires near-perfect accuracy when repaired after a collision.


Abraham Lincoln once said, “Don't believe everything you see on the internet….” While that statement is only partially true, it is an unfortunate reality for some recent advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) calibration ‘procedures’ we’ve seen. Some of the procedures will allow the system to calibrate, however, there is a dangerous consequence to relying on a YouTube video to calibrate a system; it likely won’t result in a complete, safe, quality repair.


A key factor in collision repair is making long-lasting repairs. When a vehicle is repaired, many areas of corrosion protection are disturbed. This creates corrosion hot spots, that left untreated will lead to corrosion, and potentially a repair failure. However, there are certain precautions that can be taken to safely and properly restore the corrosion protection throughout the repair process. OEMs often give specifications on restoring corrosion protection. These specifications generally include seam sealer, adhesives, foam fillers, and cavity waxes. Let’s take a look at what we learned in this series.


You may have noticed that there are many cameras/sensors, that according to the OEM Calibration Requirements Search, require calibration if installed. This statement has brought up questions from the collision industry. What does it mean to install something? If the tailgate that houses the 360° camera is installed, even though the camera wasn’t removed from the tailgate, does that qualify as the camera being installed? Let’s take a look at how to interpret this information.


Collision repairs on vehicles equipped with Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) can have more restrictions than vehicles without ADAS. Items that historically would be a simple repair may now need to be replaced. The ADAS needs to be able to see/sense in some way, whether it be by radar, camera-view, ultrasonic, etc. Repairers need to keep sensor/camera field of vision clear to avoid system malfunctions. For example, repair material that would normally be used to repair a gouge in a bumper cover is now a problem because it can block the sensor’s field of vision and may not allow the…


Collision repairs on vehicles equipped with Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) can have more restrictions than vehicles without ADAS. Items that historically would be a simple repair may now need to be replaced. The ADAS needs to be able to see/sense in some way, whether it be by radar, camera-view, ultrasonic, etc. Repairers need to keep sensor/camera field of vision clear to avoid system malfunctions. For example, repair material that would normally be used to repair a gouge in a bumper cover is now a problem because it can block the sensor’s field of vision and may not allow the…


Collision repairs on vehicles equipped with Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) can have more restrictions than vehicles without ADAS. Items that historically would be a simple repair may now need to be replaced. The ADAS needs to be able to see/sense in some way, whether it be by radar, camera-view, ultrasonic, etc. Repairers need to keep sensor/camera field of vision clear to avoid system malfunctions. For example, repair material that would normally be used to repair a gouge in a bumper cover is now a problem because it can block the sensor’s field of vision and may not allow the…


Collision repairs on vehicles equipped with Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) can have more restrictions than vehicles without ADAS. Items that historically would be a simple repair, may now need to be replaced. The ADAS needs to be able to see/sense in some way, whether it be by radar, camera-view, ultrasonic, etc. Repairers need to keep sensor/camera field of vision clear to avoid system malfunctions. For example, repair material that would normally be used to repair a gouge in a bumper cover is now a problem because it can block the sensor’s field of vision and may not allow the…


Collision repairs on vehicles equipped with Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) can have more restrictions than vehicles without ADAS. Items that historically would be a simple repair may now need to be replaced. The ADAS needs to be able to see/sense in some way, whether it be by radar, camera-view, ultrasonic, etc. Repairers need to keep sensor/camera field of vision clear to avoid system malfunctions. For example, repair material that would normally be used to repair a gouge in a bumper cover is now a problem because it can block the sensor’s field of vision and may not allow the…


Collision repairs on vehicles equipped with Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) can have more restrictions than vehicles without ADAS. Items that historically would be a simple repair may now need to be replaced. The ADAS needs to be able to see/sense in some way, whether it be by radar, camera-view, ultrasonic, etc. Repairers need to keep sensor/camera field of vision clear to avoid system malfunctions. For example, repair material that would normally be used to repair a gouge in a bumper cover is now a problem because it can block the sensor’s field of vision and may not allow the…


Collision repairs on vehicles equipped with Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) can have more restrictions than vehicles without ADAS. Items that historically would be a simple repair may now need to be replaced. The ADAS needs to be able to see/sense in some way, whether it be by radar, camera-view, ultrasonic, etc. Repairers need to keep sensor/camera field of vision clear to avoid system malfunctions. For example, repair material that would normally be used to repair a gouge in a bumper cover is now a problem because it can block the sensor’s field of vision and may not allow the…

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