Ford has released their publication, Ford On Target 2020: Volume 2. Features of this issue include an in-depth article on Ford’s position statement on the use of non-OEM structural rivets and glass. Information on the approved bonding adhesives for carbon fiber repairs on the Ford GT, and a continuation of the breakdown of the materials used in the construction of the 2020 Lincoln Corsair are also highlighted.


Ford/Lincoln has released a position statement on the use of non-OEM structural rivets on their vehicles.


Ford/Lincoln has released a position statement on the use of non-OEM glass on their vehicles.


What is a non-SRS wiring repair? It is the repairing of an electrical component that is not part of the supplemental restraints system (SRS) circuit (usually identified by yellow wire looms). As technology increases on vehicles, so does the number of components that utilize electricity. Many of the sensors and modules are becoming smarter and more sensitive. If the wire is too long, the wrong gauge, or spliced in the wrong location, it can cause malfunctions in the components that it’s powering. Many OEMs have different restrictions and guidelines for repairing wiring that does not control SRS components. On the…


When repairing a vehicle that has been involved in a collision, you may notice that there are damaged wires, connectors, and other components of the wiring harness. Some of the damaged wiring harnesses are considered non-SRS. As the RTS team researched non-SRS wiring repairability options from OEMs, we have compiled this information into a series of articles.


While searching for information on advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) on an OEM repair information site, you may come across unique calibration procedures or events. These events can vary by year and model, even within a particular make. As the RTS team has been researching these systems, we have been identifying these atypical circumstances. In order to help you better understand them, we are putting together a series of articles that will help with the repair and calibration of ADAS. Let’s take a closer look at Ford/Lincoln module programming.


A question often asked of the Repairability Technical Support (RTS) team is, "Can heat be used to straighten?" Several OEMs provide steel repairability matrices that provide heating times and temperature limits based on the type of metal being repaired, while other OEMs have restrictions on using heat at all. Let’s see what Ford/Lincoln has to say.


A question often asked of the Repairability Technical Support (RTS) team is, “Does an OEM allow the use of heat when straightening?” Several OEMs provide a steel repairability matrix that provides information on when use of heat is allowed. Many OEM’s also specify heating and temperature limits based on the type of metal being repaired. We’ve researched documentation on the use of heat during repairs and compiled the information into a series of OEM-specific articles.


Navigating OEM websites can be challenging when searching for collision repair procedures, especially as no two OEM websites are alike. What happens when you need to find other types of repair information, such as, "What needs to be inspected after a supplemental restraint system (SRS) deployment?", or "Does the tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS) require a scan tool or specialty tool?"


Did you know that many OEMs specify nugget size for spot and plug welds? This information is typically found within vehicle-specific repair procedures or can be found under general welding guidelines.


Ford/Lincoln has released two documents in regard to disinfecting for protection against the Coronavirus. The publications can be found at fordcrashparts.com.


While researching body repair manuals (BRM) and service manuals, we've created OEM-specific articles for additional information needed when repair planning. The goal of these articles is to help repairers create a more complete and accurate repair plan.


While researching body repair manuals (BRM) and service manuals, we're creating OEM-specific articles for additional information needed when repair planning. The goal of these articles is to help repairers create a more complete and accurate repair plan. One key aspect of repair planning is being aware of the advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) equipped on the vehicle. Let’s take a closer look at two examples from Ford/Lincoln.


Ford has released their publication, Ford On Target 2020: Volume 1. Features of this issue include an in-depth article on the repair of the 2019 Ford Transit side panel. A continuation of their series on proper vehicle diagnostic methods, and a breakdown of the materials used in the construction of the 2020 Lincoln Corsair.


As part of the I-CAR Repairability Technical Support (RTS) OEM linking pin activity, we are helping to connect the collision repair industry to the vehicle makers. Recently, we had a technical inquiry that asked for clarification on noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH) foam replacement on a fender.


While searching for information on advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) on an OEM repair information site, you may come across unique calibration procedures or events. These events can vary by year and model, even within a particular make. As the RTS team has been researching these systems, we have been identifying these atypical circumstances. In order to help you better understand them, we put together a series of articles that will help with the repair and calibration of ADAS.


While searching for information on advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) on an OEM repair information site, you may come across unique calibration procedures or events. These events can vary by year and model, even within a particular make. As the RTS team has been researching these systems, we have been identifying these atypical circumstances. In order to help you better understand them, we are putting together a series of articles that will help with the repair and calibration of ADAS. Let’s take a closer look at Ford/Lincoln’s parking sensors.


Ford has released their publication, Ford On Target 2019: Volume 4. Features of this issue include an overview of the 2019 Ford Ranger A-pillar reinforcement replacement, and how to identify Ford OEM glass.


Ford released a video about their fixed glass replacement. The video touches on key areas of glass removal and replacement. This is only an overview, and the vehicle-specific Workshop manual should always be referenced for glass procedures.


In case you missed it, there are now articles on how to purchase a subscription from specific OEMs. Why do you need a subscription to an OEM website if you have full subscription access to the I-CAR Repairability Technical Support (RTS) portal?

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