In case you missed it, there are now articles on how to purchase a subscription from specific OEMs. Why do you need a subscription to an OEM website if you have full subscription access to the I-CAR Repairability Technical Support (RTS) portal?


While many have noticed that advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) are showing up on vehicles, there still is confusion on what is required of these systems after a collision occurs. The Ask I-CAR team frequently gets questions in regard to calibration of ADAS. Many of these questions can be answered simply by using the OEM Calibration Requirements Search. However, there are some questions that may need more details than the calibration search provides. Let’s take a look at the 2019 Lexus RX.


Carbon fiber has been used in the automotive industry for some time now. Its strong and light weight properties made it a commonly used material for exotic vehicles. Due to the unique properties of carbon fiber, GMC has decided to utilize the material in an optional pickup truck box. This optional box will be available on select late 2019 and 2020 GMC light duty pickups. So, what does this mean for repairers?


When performing straightening repairs, having measurements is a sure-fire way to ensure the vehicle is repaired back to spec. However, many times measurements are not given for outer body panels. This isn’t the end of the world until you bring advanced driver assistance systems into the works. When mounting ADAS sensors on repaired body panels it can be crucial to have the mounting location straightened perfectly. Some OEMs have procedures on getting the measurements needed to make sure the sensor is looking in the right direction.


While many have noticed that advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS), are showing up on vehicles. There still is confusion on what is required of these systems after a collision occurs. The Ask I-CAR team frequently get questions in regard to calibration of ADAS. Many of these questions can be answered simply by searching the OEM Calibration Requirements Search. However, there are some questions that may need more details than the calibration search provides. Let’s take a look at the 2019 Toyota Camry ADAS.


Automotive advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) are well known and are frequently discussed. These systems bring safety advancements that are unprecedented, and until recently, were just the subject of science fiction.


One of the top technical inquiries received at Ask I-CAR is, “Is there a sectioning or partial replacement procedure available?” To help answer this question, RTS has an OEM Partial Part Replacement Search available. Here you will find information on if these procedures are available on a specific vehicle. Let’s take a closer look at the 2019 Lexus UX 200.


The Toyota Highlander has undergone many changes through the years, and the changes continue into 2019 for both hybrid and gas models. The Highlander is still a large SUV that is capable of seating eight people, but there are some new features that collision repair professionals should keep an eye out for.


Toyota has launched their latest edition of Collision Pros on their Collision Repair Training website. Some highlights in this issue that you may want to check out are the important details regarding pre- and post-repair checklists, and Toyota Technical Information Systems (TIS).


As you know, Bird’s Eye View or 360º Cameras are becoming more prevalent in new vehicles. It provides drivers the ability to view the surroundings of the vehicle on the center council screen. This feature is a convenient safety tool for vehicle owners. But, what does this mean for the repair process? Toyota released a document with information on how this Bird’s Eye View camera works and how to operate it. The document also contains important steps for calibrating this system.


Toyota/Lexus/Scion has documents called CRIBs or Collision Repair Information Bulletin that contain a lot of information that collision repair industry needs to know. Until recently, much of this information could be found on the Toyota Collision Repair Training webpage. Now, you will need to have a subscription to Toyota Technical Information System (TIS) in order to access these documents.


Since advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS), scanning, and calibration first started becoming relevant, members of the collision repair industry have required as much knowledge as possible on these subjects. I-CAR’s Repairability Technical Support (RTS) team continues to be on the leading edge of research and education. Our goal is to help communicate information to the industry, and a great way to do this is through Collision Repair News articles.


Are you wondering if a particular OEM or organization has a published position statement on pre-repair and post-repair scanning? We have compiled a list of most of the position statements on the subject, so you can easily find the particular statement you are looking for. The following articles give you a brief summary of the position statement along with a link to the full statement.


Now that the new year is underway, let’s take a look at some of your favorite things from 2018. We will continue with your favorite sectioning and partial part replacement articles.


One of the top technical inquiries received at Ask I-CAR is, “Is there a sectioning or partial replacement procedure available?” To help answer this question, RTS has an OEM Partial Part Replacement Search available. Here you will find information on if these procedures are available on a specific vehicle. Let’s take a closer look at the 2018 Lexus LC 500h.


Auto glass has long been considered an important part of a vehicle’s structure. In a publication released by Repairer Driven News, Toyota discusses how their pinch weld flanges are prepared in a way that “provides the best paint adhesion and corrosion protection and creates the perfect bonding surface for glass.”


As a collision repair technician, it may seem like all the necessary information you would need would be located in the service manual, but this is not the case for modern vehicles. Sometimes the information for a complete repair can be housed in multiple manuals. Fortunately, The Repairability Technical Support Portal (RTS) has videos on how to navigate each OEM website.


One of the top technical inquiries received at Ask I-CAR, "Is there a sectioning or partial replacement procedure available?" To help answer this question, RTS has an OEM Partial Part Replacement Search available. Here you will find information on if these procedures are available on a specific vehicle. Let's take a closer look at the 2017 Toyota RAV4 HV.


What is a non-SRS wiring repair? It is the repairing of an electrical component that is not part of the supplemental restraint system circuit (usually identified by yellow wire looms). As technology increases on vehicles, so does the number of components that utilize electricity. Many of the sensors and modules are becoming smarter and more sensitive. If the wire is too long, the wrong gauge, or spliced in the wrong location it can cause malfunctions in the components that it’s powering. Many OEMs have different restrictions and guidelines for repairing wiring that does not control SRS components. On the other…


As the automotive industry moves deeper into the mobility arena, it also enters a more challenging realm for the collision repair industry. The wide array of Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) that provide active safety measures for vehicle occupants are powered by an electronic communication network that requires near-perfect accuracy when repaired after a collision.

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